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Side Effects of Drug-Based Bedwetting Cures

The search for a cure to your child's bed-wetting can be a long, trying process...

 

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THE 3 CRITICAL MISTAKES PARENTS MAKE WHEN TRYING TO STOP THEIR CHILD'S BEDWETTING

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Some parents feel forced to turn to medicinal drugs to help change their child’s behaviour during the night and decrease the chance of enuresis. However, these drugs can have serious side effects and complications; extreme care should be exercised before deciding to place your child on a drug regimen for bed-wetting.

Desmopressin Acetate – Desmopressin acetate, often abbreviated DDAVP, is designed to help increase anti-diuretic hormones in your child’s body. These hormones help decrease the amount of urine produced during the night, helping to alleviate the chance of a bed-wetting episode.

The drug is available both as a nasal spray and in pill form, though the pill form is the one approved to treat bed-wetting. However, children and adults using the drug (it’s also used in diabetes treatments) should exercise great care when consuming liquids. Limit fluid consumption to only what slakes thirst; too much fluid can induce seizures.

Imipramine – Imipramine, sold under the name Tofranil, is used quite frequently to treat bed-wetting. This drug is actually an antidepressant and helps by changing your child’s sleeping patterns. It has also been shown to have an effect on the muscles surrounding the bladder, allowing your child to hold their urine for longer periods.

However, Imipramine comes with some serious potential side effects. Extreme caution should be used prior to deciding that this is the right course for your child. Potential side effects include:

  • Behavioural – Confusion, hallucinations, delusions, anxiety, nightmares, activation of latent schizophrenia, aggressiveness, decreased memory and more
  • Cardiovascular – Hypotension, tachycardia, syncope, hypertension, arrhythmia and other assorted heart and cardiovascular system problems
  • CNS – Tremors, fatigue, insomnia, headaches, speech problems, ataxia, seizures, peripheral numbness and tingling
  • Endocrine – Weight gain, gynecomastia (male breast enlargement), blood sugar depression, testicular swelling and more
  • Allergic – Rashes and itching are the most common allergic reactions to this drug, though nasal congestion, pneumonia, edema and fever have also been reported

Ditropan and Levsin – These drugs are designed for individuals with small bladders. Both function to reduce the effect of bladder contractions, as well as helping the bladder to increase in size. These drugs are sometimes combined with others mentioned above, though this is no guarantee of an effective treatment.

Side effects of Ditropan and Levsin include dry mouth and flushed, red facial features, increased sweating, increased risk of heat stroke and fever, constipation, inability to urinate, weakness, drowsiness, eye paralysis, hallucinations and more.

Obviously, drugs for the suppression of bed-wetting carry serious risks and should only be used as a last resort. A behavioural approach which uses a combination of alarm with bladder exercises, proven to be the most effective form of long-term treatment, should be tried first.

One final side effect common to all of the aforementioned drugs is that bed-wetting is likely to resume once the drug is no longer taken; these are short-term fixes, rather than actual cures.

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THE 3 CRITICAL MISTAKES PARENTS MAKE WHEN TRYING TO STOP THEIR CHILD'S BEDWETTING

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